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Showerthoughts

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Part of my text-writing pleasure is interjecting playful thoughts and tongue-in-cheek one-liners that students seem to enjoy: “Does the name Pavlov ring a bell?” (If I don’t enjoy writing—assuming psychology teaching can offer both wisdom and wit—then who will enjoy reading?)

 

As part of my, um, “executive time,” I occasionally visit Reddit’s Showerthoughts—first for delight but also for inspiration. To quote the website, a showerthought is a spontaneous “miniature epiphany that makes the mundane more interesting. . . . Showerthoughts can be funny, poignant, thought-provoking, or even just silly, but they should always prompt people to say ‘Huh, I’ve never thought about it that way before!’”

 

Some Showerthought examples:

  • Your stomach thinks all potato is mashed.
  • We don’t wash our hands, our hands wash each other.
  • Someone coined the term “coin the term.”
  • If you are the best barber in town, you know you can't get the best haircut.
  • The "b" in subtle is subtle.
  • In a nutshell, an acorn is an oak tree.
  • A lot of people die in their living rooms.
  • The two worst prison sentences are life and death.
  • If you swap the W’s in Where? What? and When? with T’s, you end up with their answers.
  • Tea is just a fancy way of saying leaf soup.
  • Everything in the entire universe either is or isn't a potato.

For your further pleasure, here are some psychology-relevant examples, each from Showerthoughts or inspired by one-liners that I encountered there. Perhaps (after my editors trim the merely silly) some of these musings will leaven our future editions?

 

Sleep: To fall asleep, fake it till you make it.

 

Loneliness: The world is full of lonely people afraid to make the first move.

 

Relationships: All of your friends you made by talking to strangers.

 

Implicit cognition: The unconscious mind is like the wind: You don’t see it, but you can see its effects.

 

Aging: To age is to shift from a life of “no limits” to “know limits.”

 

Relationships: Marrying someone because they're attractive is like buying a watermelon because it's a really nice shade of green.

 

Memory via acronyms: The acronym of "The Only Day After Yesterday" is TODAY.

 

Eating behavior: When you're “biting down" on something, you're actually biting up.

 

Sensory adaptation: Nobody realizes how much noise their air conditioning is making until it abruptly shuts off.

 

Psychokinesis claims: More spoons have been bent by ice cream than by psychics.

 

Mind and brain: When you're thinking about your brain, your brain is just thinking about itself.

 

Death: You will be the last person to die in your lifetime.

 

 

(For David Myers’ other essays on psychological science and everyday life, visit TalkPsych.com.)

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This make me chuckle and say ''oh yeah!'' throughout (:

About the Author
David Myers has spent his entire teaching career at Hope College, Michigan, where he has been voted “outstanding professor” and has been selected by students to deliver the commencement address. His award-winning research and writings have appeared in over three dozen scientific periodicals and numerous publications for the general public. He also has authored five general audience books, including The Pursuit of Happiness and Intuition: Its Powers and Perils. David Myers has chaired his city's Human Relations Commission, helped found a thriving assistance center for families in poverty, and spoken to hundreds of college and community groups. Drawing on his experience, he also has written articles and a book (A Quiet World) about hearing loss, and he is advocating a transformation in American assistive listening technology (see www.hearingloop.org).