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On the Pleasures of School Supplies (and Self-Reflection)

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If you’re reading this, I’ll bet you get a kick out of new school supplies. Those of us who teach tend to enjoy the tools of the trade. Sharing our enthusiasm for those tools – even throw-back ones like writing journals – is another way to share our enthusiasm for learning. This semester, I invested in cheerful, inexpensive blank books to add fun to pedagogical self-reflection for my first-year students.

 

I have written before on the value of students writing cover letters for their essay submissions. That accessible, high-impact self-reflective practice gives students a chance to examine their writing processes and assess their ongoing challenges and strengths. Students continually tell me these self-reflections offer long-term insights as they continue to grow as thinkers, researchers, and writers. So, I’m incorporating this strategy more broadly this semester. 

 

I invested in slim, colorful blank books for students to use as journals (see the photo), and invited them to choose a color they like and to doodle a cover design if they wish. (They have taken ownership with aplomb!) I’ve incorporated in-class writing reflections throughout the semester, carving out consistent 5-10-minute journal times for students to reflect on their learning, or simply to ask questions they might not ask aloud in class. This consistent practice also fosters confidence in students’ own fluency, by requiring that they “just keep writing” during our journaling time. (We consider this the academic parallel to Dory’s reminder in Finding Nemo: “Just keep swimming!”) As most writers know, getting over the fear of the blank page is more than half the battle of drafting. 

 

Here are a few journal prompts I’ve designed that are open-ended, but also give students a chance to practice skills they’ll use in more formal writing:

 

  • Reflecting on critical reading for college courses: Write for 10 minutes in your journal, reflecting on how you take notes on your reading to prepare for class discussions. What seems to work best for you, and why? What new approaches have you tried since starting college? What might you do differently, for better results? What questions/worries do you have? Make at least one specific connection -- and quote the text! -- to the class reading from Mindset, "A New Look at Learning."

 

  • On starting to gather sources for an essay: Write for 10 minutes in your journal on the sources you have gathered so far for your next essay. What key ideas and authors are most helpful to you at this stage, and why? What gaps do you see in your research? What do you need help with?

 

My co-author, Stuart Greene, and I have filled From Inquiry to Academic Writing with process-focused small assignments that help students reflect on every stage of the reading, research, drafting, and revision processes. Those exercises are ready for your students to use, or might inspire you to design your own.

 

However you invite your students to reflect, your response as a more expert writer is important. This need not be time-consuming. Simply affirming that writing is hard work, celebrating breakthroughs, and answering questions students are often too shy to ask in class can go a long way toward helping students feel part of this new academic community. As we all work to retain our students, this extra mode of communication helps us understand them better and teach more effectively, and gets students into the habit of self-reflection that is crucial for lifelong learning and growth.

 

Can you accomplish this without fun school supplies? Well, sure. But if my students’ throwback thrill upon choosing and decorating their writing journals is any indication, a little bling can add a dose of joy as your semester begins.

 

Please share in the comments the exercises you use to inspire student self-reflection. (Throwback school supplies are optional!)

 

Photo Credit: April Lidinsky

9 Comments
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Thanks, April. The prompts are good.

On Wed, Aug 29, 2018 at 10:09 AM april.lidinsky <

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Your first line hooked me April Lidinsky😉  Yes, I'm a sucker for new school supplies too!

Huzzah!  I wish I could share my new packet of LePens with you! Smiley Happy 

Terrific to hear!  I'd love to hear what works in your classrooms, too!

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Years ago, I reverted back to physical journaling as 10% of a student's overall grade in my face-to-face composition course. Weekly prompts are generic enough to give students freedom of expression, but they are also pointed enough to provide a few boundaries as well. I'm amazed--and humbled--by what some uncover in their writing. It's a cathartic experience for so many of them, so reflective journaling is something I plan to continue in the course. Glad it works well in your classes, too! 

A little different in a history class but I do ask students on the first day of class to reflect upon any research they might have done over the summer. They always say "none" at first but then we talk about researching things like movie times, concert information, traffic and weather.  Simple but fun for conversation on Day One.  (PS  I adore all school supplies too).

What a smart idea!  This is a fun way to reframe research for many writing courses, too. Have a great semester, Suzanne!

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This reminds me of Bruce Ballenger's approach in The Curious Researcher to conducting research that means something beyond the assignment; the key is reflection.   So often it is true that we don't know what we know until we see it on the page.  I also appreciate the affirmation dimension, collecting the notebooks and commenting.  Thanks.

Terrific reminder of The Curious Researcher!  Thanks Patricia.  Sometimes the classic pedagogical moves are still among the most effective. (As with many other aspects of teaching and learning, self-reflection is arguably one of the most crucial practices for being an effective, healthy, happy human.) 

About the Author
April Lidinsky (PhD, Literatures in English, Rutgers) is Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Indiana University South Bend. She has published and delivered numerous conference papers on writing pedagogy, women's autobiography, and creative nonfiction, and has contributed to several textbooks on writing. She has served as acting director of the University Writing Program at Notre Dame and has won several awards for her teaching and research including the 2015 Indiana University South Bend Distinguished Teaching Award, the 2017 Indiana University South Bend Eldon F. Lundquist Award for excellence in teaching and scholarly achievement, and the All-Indiana University 2017 Frederic Bachman Lieber Memorial Award for Teaching Excellence.