cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

How would you define healthy? FDA proposes new criteria for front of package "healthy" claim

jamiepopeauthor
0 0 912

How would you define healthy? I had an in-class participation where groups of students would envision themselves as an FDA subcommittee proposing a definition of healthy - led to great discussions and recognition of the many caveats to consider. This week the FDA proposed updated criteria for when foods can be labeled with the nutrient content claim “healthy” on their packaging. This proposed rule would align the definition of the “healthy” claim with current nutrition science, the updated Nutrition Facts label and the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Since more than 80% of people in the U.S. aren’t eating enough vegetables, fruit and dairy. The proposed criteria would require a food to provide a "food group equivalent" from one of these groups. And because most people consume too much added sugars, saturated fat and sodium, the new criteria would add limits on saturated fat (not total fat), sodium, and for the first time, added sugars. "The proposed rule is part of the agency’s ongoing commitment to helping consumers improve nutrition and dietary patterns to help reduce the burden of chronic disease and advance health equity. Under the proposed definition for the updated “healthy” claim, which is based on current nutrition science, more foods that are part of a healthy dietary pattern and recommended by the Dietary Guidelines would be eligible to use the claim on their labeling, including nuts and seeds, higher fat fish (such as salmon), certain oils and water. “  https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-proposes-updated-definition-healthy-claim-fo...FDA healthy Definition.png

About the Author
Jamie Pope, a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Assistant Professor of Practice in Medicine, Health and Society at Vanderbilt University, has worked in the areas of obesity research, health promotion, heart disease prevention, and since 2000 teaching introductory nutrition. Beyond the classroom, she adapted portions of her nutrition courses to produce a Massive Open Online Course attracting more than 175,000 participants from around the world. This experience earned Jamie an Innovation in Teaching award from the Vanderbilt University School of Nursing. She is the co-author of the textbook entitled Nutrition for a Changing World. Now in its second edition, the text is in use in over 140 universities across the U.S. and the recipient of a 2020 Textbook Excellence Award. Most recently she developed and produced an audio course for Learn25.com (Nutrition 101: Understanding the Science and Practice of Eating Well) that is also featured on platforms like Apple Books and Audible. Jamie holds a Master’s of Science degree in Nutrition and post graduate work in Health Psychology. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She has authored or contributed to numerous scientific and popular press publications. Jamie also held several corporate positions, serving as nutrition consultant and media representative.